Home » Mandolin Family Instruments: Mandolin, Irish Bouzouki, Mandolin Orchestra, Cittern, Mandocello, Resonator Mandolin, Electric Mandolin, Mandola by Books LLC
Mandolin Family Instruments: Mandolin, Irish Bouzouki, Mandolin Orchestra, Cittern, Mandocello, Resonator Mandolin, Electric Mandolin, Mandola Books LLC

Mandolin Family Instruments: Mandolin, Irish Bouzouki, Mandolin Orchestra, Cittern, Mandocello, Resonator Mandolin, Electric Mandolin, Mandola

Books LLC

Published July 7th 2011
ISBN : 9781157472278
Paperback
96 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 29. Chapters: Mandolin, Mandore, Gittern, Irish bouzouki, Mandolin orchestra, Mandocello, Cittern, ResonatorMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 29. Chapters: Mandolin, Mandore, Gittern, Irish bouzouki, Mandolin orchestra, Mandocello, Cittern, Resonator mandolin, Electric mandolin, Mandola, Cuatro, Octave mandolin, Bandora, Bandurria, Mandobass, Orpharion, Pau el trico, Octophone, Cylinder-back mandolin, Mandolute, Tricordia, Liuto cantabile, Classical Mandolin Society of America, Cetara. Excerpt: A mandolin (Italian: ) is a musical instrument in the lute family (plucked, or strummed). It descends from the mandore, a soprano member of the lute family. The mandolin soundboard (the top) comes in many shapes-but generally round or teardrop-shaped, sometimes with scrolls or other projections. A mandolin may have f-holes, or a single round or oval sound hole. A round or oval sound hole may be bordered with decorative rosettes or purfling, but usually doesnt feature an intricately carved grille like a Baroque era mandolin. Early mandolins had six double courses of gut strings, tuned similarly to lutes, and plucked with the fingertips. Modern mandolins-which originated in Naples, Italy in the late 18th century-commonly have four double courses (four pairs) of metal strings, which are plucked with a plectrum. Many variants of the mandolin have existed. These include Milanese, Lombard, Brescian and other 6-course types, as well as four-string (one string per course), twelve-string (three strings per course), and sixteen-string (four strings per course). Weber F-5-style mandolin (f-holes) A-5-style mandolin (f-holes) Example of an A-4-style mandolin (oval hole)A mandolin typically has a hollow wooden body with a tailpiece that holds one end of the strings, a floating bridge, a neck with a flat (or slight radius) fretted fingerboard, a nut, and mechanical tuning machines to accommodate metal strings. Like any plucked instrument, mandolin notes decay to silence rather than sound out...